EU nations receptive to Scope Management


Greetings from Copenhagen

Bo Balstrop, Carol Dekkers, Morten Korsaa
Bo Balstrop, Carol Dekkers, Morten Korsaa

I have to confess that Europeans are much more progressive and receptive to evolutionary ideas such as northernSCOPE and formalized unit pricing ($/FP) on public tendering of IT projects than the U.S.  Just this week, I met with four different groups and presented the highlights and gains to be made from adopting formalized scope management, and I am hopeful that we (Delta Axiom of Denmark, my company Quality Plus Technologies, and 4SUM Partners of Finland) can begin to offer Certified Scope Management (CSM) training courses in Denmark in the not-too-distant future.  The approach is straight-forward and minimizes the lose/lose risk that accompanies firm fixed pricing of software projects when the requirements are not well-known.

Also interesting was the fact that those most interested in learning more about the method are not even from customer or developer groups that outsource (tender) their software development, but rather companies that do development in-house.  It wasn’t a hard sell at all – the audiences in all four presentations were receptive, open to discuss how northernSCOPE might work in their organizations, and optimistic about how it can succeed in Denmark.  After all, if we can create the demand for Certified Scope Manager (CSM) services with the public or private sectors, then training is the natural next step to create CSM’s to satisfy such demand.

Representatives from one of the nation’s largest government departments that governs taxation, the equivalent of the IRS in the US, were on-hand and expressed interest in knowing more.  I’m not sure why, aside from the “not-invented-here” characteristic (that plagues more than just the US), scope management has not raised anything more than a passing glance in the US.  With all the major expenditures on software intensive systems projects underway with our public administration and Department of Defense, together with rework figures hovering around 40%, you’d think that formalized Scope Management (aka northernSCOPE) would be of interest.  While the economy definitely plays a role to cut interest in training and consulting overall, it is still a question mark in this author’s mind why there is little interest despite ample presentations and workshops I’ve done at technology conferences throughout the US over the past few years.

No worries though… as long as some part of the world sees value in the method today – it matters not where the demand is rising.  It will be interesting to watch as more CSM’s are certified in Europe to see if it peaks any interest in my home continent.

Best wishes for healthy, productive projects.

p.s., Want to know more about northernSCOPE and the Certified Scope Manager (CSM) designation?  Email me for a copy of our northernSCOPE brochure and our CSM training information.

Carol

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5 responses to “EU nations receptive to Scope Management

  1. Hey Carol, greetings from Brazil! Here in Brazil the public organizations start to use unit pricing ($/FP) in 2004 just after a government regulation. Some bad and some good practices are in use and I would like to exchange some experiences from your initiative if you would like.

    Regards!
    Gustavo

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  2. The idea of controlling scope, as we discussed before, is one of those major problems for projects. Requirement creep greatly adds to the cost of software projects. Working closely, intimately between the customer and development team (personnel) within their respective chains of command in America tends to prevent that effort. I have read a good deal of your book and agree with more of it as I read.

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  3. Pingback: IT’s all about the People, Stupid… | Musings About Software Development

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