Pre-flight email checklist: THINK before you click…


I AM OVERWHELMED BY EMAIL!

There I said it, I am overwhelmed with email and I can’t stand it!

I thought I was the only one until I read Tim Tyrell-Smith’s post today: How to reduce the Quantity of Incoming Email and realized that there should be a pre-flight email checklist to save our sanity… and to encourage Thinking before Clicking!

Since joining the world of social media I realize my “connectivity” has grown exponentially, but not all in a good way. Even with my SPAM filters set to high, I get so much email that it is overwhelming!

I feel like I must have ADD (attention deficit disorder) because my day is interruption after interruption (sorry TweetDeck!) and I need help (and I know I am not the only one!)

Pre-flight email checklist (THINK before you click):

  1. If it takes longer to write an email (to one person) than it does to walk across the hall / call the person, don’t write an email. Pick up the phone or get up from your desk.
  2. If multiple people are involved and you need responses, consider whether a one hour meeting would work better than filling up in baskets with back and forth threads for the next 2 weeks.  If so, schedule a tight meeting and solve the issue in one fell swoop.  (Just because it doesn’t take paper doesn’t mean email is green — it can litter cyberspace!)
  3. If 1 and 2 are not possible, consider other options: Twitter or a blog post or an update at a staff meeting might be better than email.
  4. You’ve thought through 1,2 and 3 and decide your message needs an email.  Never negligently click “Reply all!”  unless you’ve gone through these same steps:Make sure you set aside a dedicated time (10 minutes minimum) to THINK before you click:
  • Consider your recipient: Walk for a moment in their shoes and think: what would be your response to this email? Make sure to emphasize the key points (i.e., make the reason for the email crystal clear). Do not “assume” that everyone shares your knowledge so give necessary background.  In the words of Peter Drucker:  It is important to state the obvious otherwise it may be overlooked.
  • If you expect/need a response, be clear about it. Tell recipients what you need from them (each), by when, and how (call, email, comment, decide…).
  • If it is an information only email, say so. No one has time to read your mind.
  • Consider using the subject line as a filing cabinet: Use tags to identify topics and intent. E.g., ABC Department meeting notice, Feb 17, prep material attached; or Dekkers: Blog Marketing draft – comments needed by Feb 20, 2011.  In this way, recipients can quickly find YOUR email from a pile in their in basket.
  • Consolidate information! If the email is about a meeting: include dial-in information (top and center for easy access!), meeting date and time, and  attach all preparatory material all together in a single email. There is nothing worse than having to pull up 3 emails to get ready for a single meeting!
  • Preview before sending: Spellcheck, attach files, check all recipients are included.
  • If there is emotion involved save the draft email and wait a full day (or at least an hour) before doing the doublecheck and send step below.
  • If it’s a regular email (non-emotional), take a one minute break – stand up, look out the window, anything to clear your head. Then go back and re-read your email, double-check attachments, recipients, bcc’s etc.
  • When you are sure it looks right consciously hit “send”. NEVER hit send when you are multi-tasking (i.e., on the phone). Once an email has been sent it is in cyberspace FOREVER (regardless of rescinds!)

I plan to follow this checklist starting today! What do YOU think? Do you have any additions?

p.s., DON’T forget to sign up for my Feb 17, 2011 (11am – 12:30 pm EST)  FREE Webinar:  Navigating the Minefield – Estimating before Requirements.

Register here: http://tinyurl.com/6flgjwr

To your increased productivity!
Carol

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2 responses to “Pre-flight email checklist: THINK before you click…

  1. Good suggestions, Carol. Glad to to help inspire you! Here’s one: any time I have an important or sensitive/emotional topic, I always save the email as a draft until the next day. And usually my more logical read leads to deleting and taking care of the communication in a more personal way.

    Good luck with your webinar. 🙂

    Like

    • Tim,

      Thanks for your comments. Nice to connect and I look forward to your future posts.

      p.s., My last webinar a year ago with the same topic had over 2000 registrants and over 700 showed up. Always a fun time!

      Carol

      Like

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