Walking on Eggshells – a Normal part of Business?


We have all been there – walking on eggshells to avoid outbursts from  a boss, co-worker, or client.  So we skirt the issue, pretend the bad behavior doesn’t exist, ignore the problem, and spend extra time planning how to present an issue so that the person in question doesn’t explode.

While I know that this type of behavior is rampant in business (I’ve experienced it more than once!) – it has serious (and expensive) consequences in the IT industry.  The repercussions stemming from having to “walk on eggshells” to avoid the potential wrath ranges from minor  “oversights” to full scale project failure.

The Challenger disaster is one such failure where group-think and avoidance of conflict ended up costing lives and millions of dollars.  A video chronicling the group think behavior depicts the group-think behavior and steps are taken in companies to address such behaviors. This is all good.

The Walking on Eggshells “syndrome”

Aside from the pressures of group think that encourages teams to conform and cooperate with a single mindset, the “walking on eggshells” syndrome is seldom documented or even discussed.

We all know at least one offender in our workplace!  The offending person may be a narcissist, a control freak, a bully or just plain immature. No matter the clinical diagnosis, our boardrooms and our production labs suffer greatly from their presence.

How much time and money could be saved by confronting these people and addressing the cost of their ‘verbal diarrhea’? Here’s the type of situations I mean:

  • Not raising issues:  “How can we possibly bring up the design flaw for this software now?  The project sponsor will yell and rant if the project is late. Remember how he “freaked out” at the status meeting last month?  Keep going and we’ll address this as an enhancement.”  Cost: could be significant.
  • Cutting corners: “There is no way we can finish the project within the approved budget.  We had no idea that xxx would be so complex, but the steering committee will fire us if we ask for more money. Let’s just cut testing so we can finish the project.”  Cost: could be critical if public safety is at stake.
  • Perpetuating the myth that project plans are right:  “The project plan was based on incomplete data that seemed right six months ago. Now we know more, but with a fixed budget and schedule, we’re stuck. The client will explode if we bring up that the plans were flawed. Let’s just do what we can.” Cost: Corporate learning will never happen (Einstein: insanity is doing the same things over and over and expecting different results.)
  • Skirting accountability: “We messed up on the schedule because we had to program that module 3 times.  I couldn’t understand what they wanted until this time, but we can’t tell Bob because you know how he gets.  I hate it when he yells in a staff meeting.” Cost: could be significant to minor.
  • Wasting time and money: “This project is doomed – the users told us they won’t use the system even if we finish it. The rationale and vision for the project are no longer correct (it’s a dog!) but if we tell the boss about it, you know how she will blame us. I don’t think it is even worth trying to explain it.  Just keep going.”  Cost:  priceless – time and money could be better spent on REAL work!

What a colossal waste of time, money, energy, and morale “walking on eggshells” is to a business!  It is not an easy situation to fix or address – especially when we are talking about people in power who behave badly.

Walking on eggshells should never be part of the way of doing business!  What is the solution?

If YOU were the king of your IT kingdom, what would YOU do?  I’ll publish a summary of responses – add your comments below – or send them privately to me by email to dekkers (at) qualityplustech (dot) com.

Have a productive week!

Carol

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One response to “Walking on Eggshells – a Normal part of Business?

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